What will Miami look like if the sea level rose?

Click to view some of the cities landmarks under different levels of water
None    3ft   5ft   7ft   10ft  






Miami and its surroundings are facing a calamity worthy of the Old Testament. Roughly a third of the U.S. population—more than 100 million people—live in coastal counties. Coastal states with large areas of low-lying land, including Louisiana, Florida, North Carolina, California, and South Carolina, are particularly vulnerable to rising seas and coastal storm surges. The risks to coastal states include:
• Shoreline erosion and degradation.
• Amplified storm surges.
• Permanent inundation.
What makes Miami exceptionally vulnerable to climate change is its unique geology. The city – and its satellite towns and resorts – is built on a dome of porous limestone which is soaking up the rising seawater, slowly filling up the city's foundations and then bubbling up through drains and pipes.

Water's Edge

Below are maps that display which areas will be covered in water if sea level rise reachs different levels
Sea level Rise +5ft                                                                          Sea level Rise +10ft
edge

Percentage of Population Being Impacted

Below are maps that display the percentage of the population per area that will be affected and have to evacuate permanently if sea level rises to these points
Sea level Rise +5ft                                                                          Sea level Rise +10ft
pop


PROPERTY VALUE EXPOSED IN MIAMI ON LAND BELOW 1-10 FT in 2014

($MILLION)
graphs

Structures and Public Areas Affected by Sea Level Rises of

3 feet   5 feet   7 feet  






Biscayne Aquifer

The storagehouse of South Floridian Water





Organizations That Help






Sources

www.climatecentral.org
www.sealevel.climatecentral.org
www.miamidade.gov
www.city-data.com/income/income-Miami-Florida.html
www.southeastfloridaclimatecompact.org/